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Result | Public Health

Convincing McDonald’s and Subway to protect public health

In 2015, bolstered by the support of more than 100,000 members and supporters, we convinced both McDonald’s and Subway to take action to protect public health. In March, just two days after we delivered more than 30,000 petitions to McDonald’s headquarters, the company announced that they would stop serving chicken raised on medically-important antibiotics. And in October, after more than 100,000 called on the chain to take action, Subway announced a similar policy for all the meat they serve.

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Result | Higher Ed

Protecting students from unfair bank fees

We helped win protections for students from unfair fees associated with campus bank accounts. The new rules, released by the U.S. Department of Education, ban some of the worst and most predatory fees that students encounter from banks.

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Result | Public Health

Victory: Macy's commits to phase out toxic flame retardents

We did it: Macy's announced it will stop selling furniture that contains toxic flame retardants.

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Result | Public Health

Victory: Subway Announces Plan to Go Antibiotic Free

We're ecstatic that Subway will be living up to the healthy image they've created. They have more restaurants in the U.S. than any other chain, and their announcement will put major market pressure on the meat producers to stop overusing antibiotics.

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Blog Post | Transportation

How Deadly are Your State’s Roads? | Sean Doyle

A new report by Michael Sivak and Brandon Schoettle at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute shows which states have the safest and most dangerous roads.  Here's how the states rank and what we can do about it.

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News Release | Maryland PIRG Foundation | Transportation

Report Shows Baltimorians Driving Less, Using Transit and Alternatives More

Baltimore – A first-of-its-kind report by Maryland PIRG Foundation shows reduced driving miles and rates of car commuting in Maryland’s urbanized areas—including Baltimore —and greater use of public transit and biking

 

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Toxic Toys

The 28th "Trouble in Toyland" report, released on Tuesday, summarized the various toys which could be harmful for children.

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"Trouble in Toyland" report warns of toy hazards

Concerned about inadvertently stuffing the stockings with lead or other dangerous metals and chemicals? The Maryland Public Interest Research Group has just the study for you. Its "Trouble in Toyland" report -- the 28th annual toy-safety survey by U.S. PIRG and its state affiliates -- warns people to "be wary when shopping this holiday season." Though researchers have seen improvements over the years, they're still finding problems ranging from high levels of lead to choking hazards.

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Toy Safety Concerns Outlined in Annual Report

Toxic chemicals, choking hazards and volume so loud it can damage hearing. You can find all three in toys that are on store shelves here in Maryland; something a state public interest group found after they took a closer look at the toys for sale locally.

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Survey Finds Dangerous Toys on Store Shelves

Annapolis and Baltimore, Maryland, Nov. 26 – Dangerous or toxic toys can still be found on America’s store shelves, according to Maryland Public Interest Research Group’s 28th annual Trouble in Toyland report which was released in Baltimore at Sinai Hospital, and in Annapolis at the Chesapeake Children’s Museum. The survey of hazardous toys found that despite recent progress, consumers must still be wary when shopping this holiday season.

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Blog Post | Consumer Protection

Credit CARD Act Turns 5, A Big Success Story | Ed Mierzwinski

The Credit CARD Act of 2009, which had its 5th birthday on May 22, is a government success story that cleaned up a Wild West credit card marketplace by eliminating unfair tricks and traps without destroying the market. Despite “sky is falling” claims of impending doom from industry apologists at the time, the credit card industry is still strong and consumers can choose from a variety of cards.

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Blog Post | Consumer Protection

The end of net neutrality as we know it? | Ed Mierzwinski

On Thursday, 5/15 the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) meets to propose new rules "to protect and promote the open Internet." It has no choice because a U.S. appellate court threw out parts of its current rules in a January decision favoring the telephone company Verizon. The decision did not eliminate FCC authority to regulate the Internet, but it did make it more complicated.

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Blog Post | Consumer Protection

How to protect yourself from the security bug Heartbleed | Emily Scarr

DO NOT rush to change your passwords on all of your favorite websites. You shouldn’t change your password on a site until the site has fixed the Heartbleed bug, or else you risk having your new password compromised. Watch for a notice on the site, but don’t click any links in emails claiming to be from the website.

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Blog Post | Food

Testimony on SB0778 / HB1191 Genetically Engineered Food – Labeling Requirements | Emily Scarr

Maryland consumers have a right to know what’s in the food we buy, so we can make healthy, responsible, and informed choices about what we’re eating. Manufacturers are required by federal law to list ingredients and other nutrition information on food packaging, but whether or not a food is genetically modified is not included. More than 60 countries, including the entire European Union, already require GMO labeling, but in the U.S., consumers are still denied this basic information.  

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Blog Post | Solid Waste

Testimony on SB 0394 Statewide Container Recycling Refund Program | Emily Scarr

Maryland PIRG supports SB 0394, which establishes a statewide redeemable 5 cent deposit on single use beverage containers to decrease litter and waste. Putting recyclable trash in landfills or burning it through incineration is unnecessary and terrible for public health and the environment.

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Priority Action

We're teaming up with big restaurant chains to stop the overuse of antibiotics on factory farms. Call on KFC to stop selling meat raised on routine antibiotics.

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